working it out is the real relationship

The Real Relationship: Working it Out

The real relationship happened last night. I had been struggling, feeling stuck, pushing myself in ways that were leaving me frustrated, angry, and sad. My husband was mad at me for this. He pulled away and let me struggle. Finally, I said, “Why aren’t you helping me? Why have you left me alone in this?”

“I cannot help you with the project you are working on,” he said. “I don’t mean that,” I said. “Why aren’t you helping me emotionally — don’t you see I am stuck? I am confused. I don’t know how to get out of this state of being.” We talked. We argued. We hashed it out. He said, “You remind me of my mother when she was stuck, and it hurts too much. I feel helpless and upset, and I don’t know how to help you. So, I get angry and pull away.”

Why couldn’t you have just said that? I think to myself. But I know the answer. He doesn’t know how. He doesn’t even know what he is feeling until we talk it out.

I get caught in my struggle — fighting myself, fighting my life, instead of knowing how to be, how to let go, how to flow. He sees me, and he gets caught in his battle of what to do with someone who is momentarily lost. “I need support,” I insist. “I need someone to help me break through my panic, my frustration, confusion — my craziness. I need you to help me.” “Okay,” he says. “Okay. I didn’t know.”

We have connected again. We feel close again. I don’t feel abandoned, and my husband doesn’t feel helpless. But there is no way to learn to reach towards each other, without the ‘fall’ from grace into the hell of conflict and hurt feelings, followed by the hashing it out and then the move back into connection. That is the only way. Learning to reconnect is iterative. We do it over and over again. This process is part of building a connected relationship.

The real relationship isn’t necessarily happening when we are on cruise control, but when the events of our lives force us to tackle something. It happens when we struggle; when we are forced to look at ourselves and the emotional issues that we need to address to bridge the gap between us.

This process is how we learn about ourselves and each other and how to be there for each other. This is how we repair old wounds, heal, and grow.

One more knot has been smoothed in each of us, and between us. This is how it is. This is how we learn to love. Working it out is the real relationship.

For some relationship inspirational quotes – https://www.instagram.com/weconcile/

If you want to learn more about courage – https://blog.weconcile.com/2019/07/12/what-stops-you-from-your-courage/

When the Journey is Abundance

When the Journey is Abundance

After years of struggle and a slow spiral into death, at the age of 46, I gave up on my first marriage. From those ashes of grief, new life emerged. I wrote a relationship education program. Would it help me in my next true love relationship?

Relationships had been my Achilles heel, at least relationships with people. I was fine with dogs, cats, horses, goats, ducks, and cows. Good with rabbits, and guinea pigs too. I loved them. They were safe. But people….

I was a sad and lonely child with no close friends. No hugs or I love you’s in my family. Mom was on the Asperger continuum. Dad caught in his own demons, was dangerously explosive. Both were capable of inflicting severe emotional abuse. I saw people as dangerous and hurtful.

Not fully formed, I couldn’t say no to others, stand to disappoint, nor ask for what I wanted. In my teens, I ran from interested others. When I was 22, I began my first romantic relationship.  Starving for love, I wasn’t the best judge. He became obsessed with me. I was his everything. But on a quest to find my purpose and career, I wasn’t ready to settle down. Eventually, feeling caged in, I ended it.

I was living in a world where consciously, I valued my career, but unconsciously, I was desperately seeking human connection. It was a conundrum and required me to shift before I could balance both.

After I failed at a few more relationships with addicts, alcoholics, and others who, despite their beauty, couldn’t fully participate, I realized I had some serious issues. I fell in love, but when our differences emerged, when the “in love” feeling left, I would become captivated with a new special person and end the previous and now colorless relationship. I was addicted to the “in love” neurochemicals. Knowing tenacity, courage and empathy were essential in a love that could make the long haul, was not part of my awareness. Still, I knew I needed to stick it out with somebody and not give up when the dopamine waned. Overcompensating, I swung to the other side of the pendulum, staying in the next two relationships much longer than I should have.

The first, a passionate man with addictions to crack, sex, alcohol, cheating, a man in and out of rehabs, with me desperately trying to fix, help, save – this relationship put me on the self-growth path that became my life. The second was the man who would become my first husband. When I met him, I knew I could marry him. He felt Solid. Dependable. Serious. It was a thorny bond. We triggered each other constantly. Yet, we expanded each other. I encouraged him to follow his dreams (my strength), and he supported me financially (his strength) through graduate school. Early in our relationship, after he humiliated me for struggling when hiking in ill-fitting old boots he had loaned me, I gave him an ultimatum. Couples therapy or I can’t do this.

He chose therapy, reluctantly. I stayed. We struggled. I fought for us, fought for him to look inside as I was. The uncovering of lost memories and feelings. The seeking to understand how we continually upset each other. If he would just do this. He didn’t want to. He didn’t want to look at the hurt and shame he had suffered as a child and covered up with his angry acting out. He resented me. I didn’t yet know I needed and deserved a cooperative partner. I was used to doing all of the work myself.

Despite the vast distance that had grown between us, I was finding myself. I was changing. After years of self-help and workshops, of individual therapy and couples therapy, of graduate school and training, of working with individuals and couples, I finally gave up on my first marriage of eleven years. By then I was a licensed marriage and family therapist. I was immersed in self-transformation and helping others find the ground under them. This was my gift, where I excelled.

The One

Eventually, I found ‘the one.’ We fell head over heels. We were pretty fantastic together. But, as one can expect, issues began to arise. Like the time he picked me up to go to a party, but he had left the cat door closed, and my cat Hank, was locked out of the house. I had visions of cat murders by coyotes. He thought I went nuts when I freaked out. I thought he was insensitive and obtuse. What we didn’t understand about each other; the pain he’d been caused by crazy people. And the pain I had experienced from traumatic events with pets and people who didn’t care. We didn’t know how to get underneath our fight to these deep stories. We each recoiled into our respective corners and suffered alone, unable to bridge the gap between us, our hearts wounded and closed.

In my work, I saw how mired couples often were, how they reacted to each other, how little space they had to listen to each other, how much they each needed me to see their side. I experienced how difficult it was to slow them down, to delicately peel the layers to the hurt and needs under their reactions, to build understanding, empathy, and vulnerability within and between them. I saw how few tools they had, and how despite claims of ‘good’ childhoods, they hadn’t seen, realized or metabolized the gaps between the nurturing they needed and the nurturing they received. I was steeped in their pain and struggles.

WeConcile is born

From a lonely fragmented girl, I moved into my empowered self, with a desire to alleviate some of the relational pain that had also been mine. I glimpsed something new. Something that had never been done before shimmered at the edges of my vision. Could an e-learning system teach couples what I had learned and applied to my life, as I took training after training, year after year? I breathed, dreamed and wrestled with the question, “How do I create a learnable journey so relationships can bloom – even without a therapist?” “Could it even be done?”

I moved into action. We were a team now, with a third coding partner. I developed content to teach couples skills they would build on as they traversed through a process of learning, looking within, and communicating: creating an openhearted, more connected and less conflictual relationship. I wrote and organized. My husband to be became my editor. We talked, haggled, discussed. I explained, insisted, argued. With every deep discussion, whether about the project or our lives, our relationship got better. We began to delve more deeply into what happened between us. Why did his stomach ache after we fought? Why did I feel paralyzed, as if I was lost in a dark cave, all alone, with no ability to reach towards him and bridge the gap? I learned from the outside as a therapist, and from the inside as a vulnerable member of a couple. By the end of 4 years, I finished the content. It was amazing. Our relationship was better, fights shorter, recovery quicker.

We taught each other. Me, with my nose to the grindstone. Him, with his trust of the universe, uncannily knowing whatever he needed would appear. He was happier than me. I was more astute about relationships with brilliant ahas. He learned to show up more fully, to listen and learn. I learned to play more and grab onto more joy.

We were ready to get our project out into the world. Did I believe in myself enough? Just as my husband and I opened each other up to growth and a stronger we, so my relationship with this project insisted I grow. I had to learn to ask for help, to decide I was worth helping. My cry became “help me.” Not once, not twice, but over and over. I reached. I demanded. I confronted beliefs. Beliefs that said, “why you?” Beliefs that did not support me saying, “I can do this.”

I said to my husband (we married in the middle of this process), “help me do this.”

I uncovered my inner bag lady. I had seen hints of her before, an aspect of me that felt I wasn’t safe, would never have enough, who believed I could die homeless and alone on a street. I explained to her, we weren’t going to hide in the dark alone. We were coming out to join with the great energy circulating the planet, enlivening, enlightening. We would trust being part of the world. She would merge into me, instead of keeping me hidden, disconnected and not trusting. I would release the part of me desiring a monastic and isolated life. I knew this was not my path, would not bring me to my greatest empowerment. I knew I had to step into my magic and ask for what I wanted. The asking itself was the alchemy that would allow me to be fully empowered.

The gold wasn’t the project, but the process – who each of us turned into, how our relationship grew and how we each grew as individuals. How we learned to support and nourish each other, to turn towards each other. How our deep friendship allowed us to continue to look at places where our connection would rupture, where other loyalties sometimes intruded. How we learned to share our tender hearts.

I taught my husband to look at himself, to deepen, to explore. I showed him relationships included listening, tending, paying attention. I saw relational patterns clearly. This was my talent and gift. He taught me to trust, to play more and to know life is an abundant exchange of energy between each of us and our world. This was his gift. In our work together and in our creation of a connected and beautiful life together, we called each other to our greatest selves and our greatest relationship.

relationship help

Untangling Love

This story is about love. It comes out of my realizing how I am changing. It comes out of my desire for a new world. It is about my belief that we are all beings of love and healing includes a journey into the darker parts of ourselves to exhume, tend and ultimately to heal and transform into love.

How did your family of origin influence your ability to love?

In my family, love was hidden under other agendas. It just wasn’t the focus. My father was obsessed with his artistic vision. He struggled with depression and rage. My mother was emotionally cut off. Her focus was on the practical. Had we cleaned our rooms? Were our chores completed? Affirmation was rare. Although my father could be playful, both parents were often stressed and were critical of others. Between these two people, there were four children. I was one of those children, and my childhood impacted my ability to love.

Learning how to truly love (both self and others) has been a life path for me. I survived my childhood because I found love with the animals that surrounded me. They accepted me. They had time for me. I felt safe with them. They expressed love towards me and I towards them. I also knew there were realities other than the one I felt trapped in because I read. I read voraciously. I read to escape my life and be in another place. I read to find comfort. I read to find a place in which I could reside.

Over the years, living from the guidelines my parents indoctrinated in me, I learned that my focus on productivity often shortchanged my ability to love, to be loving, to honor my partner. Luckily, life created some relational disasters for me and caused me to begin to look at myself, to start the task of sorting through the aspects of myself that simply did not work for all of me.

Untangling as a growth choice

I have been on a growth path for many years, I am slowly correcting my deficits and growing my positive qualities. Real love is one of the true joys of this world. If we do not learn to create it, we shall have robbed ourselves and those we are blessed to share our lives with. Each moment is precious. In each moment there is always a choice. The choice is usually between what is life-affirming and what is not. Sometimes we choose the less life-affirming path. That is important because we get to experience what does not work, what does not fill us with joy. And in the next moment, we again have another choice. At any point, our choices may change. What and how we choose becomes our path. Sometimes we are caught. We don’t know which way to go, what to choose, or even how to choose. That is when working on ‘untangling’ becomes the most productive choice. This has been my destiny and my path, and doing so has become a massive force in my life.

I want a world of beauty, where people are not afraid of their emotions, or of connecting. Where we don’t have to put others down to feel okay about ourselves. Where we don’t have to deny others because we only feel okay if we have more or because we are scared that there isn’t enough. Because of the kind of world that I want, I must look at every part of myself that is not that. For those parts need support and love if they are to transform.

We innately resonate with that which is beautiful

Relationship help

photo by Jennifer Lehr

I believe that we are more than the material realm, more than matter. We are more than the horrors we see on the news and in our lives. We are more than the greed that impacts us every day. We resonate with qualities that are beautiful. We resonate with the experience of truth and love. We resonate with peace and appreciation.

I once worked with a young teenager who came from a family of gang members and was part of that gang culture himself. As a child, he had seen his father murder a member of another gang. His brother was in jail. That was what he knew. But one day walking to the therapy office with me, he stopped in front of a poster of trees. He said that he liked how it made him feel. He said he wished he could be there, in those trees, in that sense of peace.

Looking more deeply

I believe that we are all part of the divine, on a journey to allow that which is divine to fully manifest, for ourselves and for all others with whom we relate — and if we are all free and honored, with whom we can dance. Our journey into the light is equally a journey down into the depths. If you position yourself as a being of love, meaning a part of the divine spark of life, then you have to look at the components of yourself that are not about love. This cannot be done by pushing away the dark parts of yourself.

I refuse to allow myself to not be a part of the flow of consciousness that is about increasing love and decreasing suffering on this planet. I refuse to accept that suffering that is created by ignorance or heartlessness is okay.

For me, the journey starts inside myself. It starts with learning how to honor myself and others. And it includes trusting that I can work with what I have been given and make it meaningful and purposeful.

As we open into painful feelings, we begin a process of remembering ourselves. It is as if we live out of one part of ourselves, and have put the others, the parts that hold complicated feelings, away. These aspects sometimes jump out unbidden, but we do not really know them. We live out of a fragment of ourselves instead of a cohesive whole. We are a segregated being. And as the microcosm, so is the macrocosm. We contribute to a world where certain things are not accepted or are pushed away, whether it is a feeling or somebody else’s rights.

I have an advantage here. I am naturally a digger and a burrower. I instinctively root out and explore the dark parts of myself. I cannot imagine doing otherwise. I am grateful for this ability. I am thankful for the gifts this talent has given me. For those of you who avoid stepping into and looking at your more tormented parts, you may find this idea uncomfortable. And yet, if you can stick with it, you will learn that these feelings are temporary and transformable.

How does one do this without overwhelm? Or being repulsed and pushing away? I think of a couple who I had worked with. As the male partner began to allow himself more vulnerability (which was necessary), the female partner began to feel disgusted. Although she wanted him more attuned to her, to feelings, to connection, she could not tolerate the very ingredient that would get him there. Her work would be to look at her fear of a ‘soft’ man. She would need to unpack many experiences she had around her father and around her ideas of being protected by the masculine element and let down by softness. Deep issues will not heal on their own. But beginning the journey of looking more deeply at ourselves can be overwhelming and confusing. We often don’t know where to start.

Help is available

The task of looking at and sorting through our profound and often overwhelming issues can be helped by looking at the myth of Psyche and Eros and Psyche’s interactions with Aphrodite. Psyche was a beautiful woman. The Goddess Aphrodite was jealous of Psyche and gave her many impossible tasks. The first was for Psyche to sort through a vast granary filled with many different kinds of seeds. Psyche was instructed to sort through them by sundown. Psyche was beside herself, crying and completely overwhelmed. As she cries, an army of ants arrives, and they began to sort the seeds. By nightfall, the task was complete. Psyche was not able to sort the seeds herself. She needed assistance, and because she had a clear intention with integrity, help arrived.

There is help for relationships and personal development. One only need to pick a path to follow or several. Some include:

12-step programs
Therapy
A relational, educational process like WeConcile®
Workshops
Youtubes by various teachers, gurus, and healers

As we become more integrated and step more fully into the process of reclaiming our whole selves, we begin to be lighter. We begin to be more whole. What is dead comes to life and has an opportunity to engage consciously. A dialogue ensues. We become happier. We begin to love all of ourselves. The quality of our connections become filled with more love. Our life and life itself becomes fuller.

You can read our WeConcile FAQ here: https://www.weconcile.com/faq.html

The Journey of Improving Our Relationships

The Journey of Improving Our Relationships

How does having a significant illness relate to being in a relationship that doesn’t work? How do we take that understanding and apply it to improve our relationships?

In 2016, when I was struggling with Lyme disease, in desperation, I went to an alternative treatment center. The treatments included shots, IV’s and fevers which could get out of control, body temperatures moving to unsafe levels. The needles pushing through tender skin, hurting despite the icing of the area previously. The weight of the IV needle in the vein hindering easy movement. There was no way to escape the discomfort of the treatments that went on from morning into the night for several months or the exhaustion from both the illness and the remedy. I found the treatment to be stressful, traumatic and at times painful. But I knew I needed to get better and I was willing to suffer to find my health again.

You might ask how this situation relates to being in a relationship that isn’t as good as it could be, or where a couple is struggling. These two journeys are somewhat different, but parallels exist. In both cases, we are in a state of dis-ease and we are looking for healing or wholeness.

When I was at that clinic, I created a mantra, which I used to focus my intentions and attitudes.

Please help me find health.

Please help me be safe.

Please help me have courage.

Please help me hear the guidance of my higher self.

I silently repeated this mantra over and over. When I was getting a painful shot or sitting in a bathtub full of ice and ice water in an attempt to keep my fever from getting dangerously high, I would say this mantra to myself. I used it to ground myself. I used it to keep my focus clear. I used it to reassure and soothe myself.

A person in a failing relationship can easily get overwhelmed with distress, with feeling unsafe emotionally, with not knowing if they can get through the difficulties, with lacking clarity and not knowing which way to turn or how to navigate through the disruptions between themselves and their partner. Like my Lyme journey, a relational journey also requires courage, reassurance, guidance, safety and the desire for the relationship to return to health or wholeness.

I was lucky to have mostly kind staff and nurses, and the patients were silly and playful with each other. We created the support we needed amongst ourselves. Connection is another part of what gets us through difficult times. In a relationship that works, we have connection that supports us through life’s challenges. But in a relationship that doesn’t work, often we do not have that safe connection with our partner.

It is painful when we fight, when we don’t know if our relationship will survive. It is painful to feel confused and not know which way to turn, or how to get an argument to turn into a more productive conversation.

Yet our desires for a better relationship are achievable. We can learn how to create healthy emotional and relational selves. We can create safety in our relationship. We can find our courage if we have guidance. And we can learn to ‘hear’ the right way to go.

But without new information coming into our ‘system’ we often don’t know how to proceed.

WeConcile is a do-it-yourself online relationship course designed to teach you how to change your relationship, how to make it safe and healthy. You can find your courage and become a full team with your partner. You will learn new ways of being that will open up new connections in your relationship. And unlike dealing with a major illness, you can enjoy the process of gaining more contact with, and understanding of your partner.

Recovering from Lyme disease is a long journey. Some of the people I went to that clinic with have passed. They were not able to defeat the disease. Others are still struggling. Some, like myself, are more or less, better. I never gave up. I sought to recover, to find new knowledge, new tools. It took many treatments, a clear focus on what I wanted, and continued courage and persistence. I was one of the lucky ones who found what I needed.

You are on your own journey. But a journey is just that – moving through terrain, from one location to another. Your journey can lead you to a place where you have the love you have always desired. Don’t give up on your dreams. It is completely doable to create a nourishing and peaceful relationship and the process of doing so is no longer a mystery. A science of love exists with the tools you need. You only need to choose to begin the journey of healing your relationship.

Saying No to Someone You Love

Saying No to Someone You Love

Sometimes, from deep inside us, it emerges, almost unexpected – NO. No, I will not do that. No, what you are doing is not okay. No, I will not participate. No, I will stop myself from behaving that way.

When we find our ‘No,’ claim it and own it without anger, we are well on the way to being able to take care of ourselves emotionally

I remember years ago being someone who could not say no. As I learned to be able to say no, I had to have a reason. No, I cannot go with you tonight because I have plans. No, I cannot help you because I am already booked.

But saying “No, I am not interested in doing that, but thanks for asking,” was not yet in my vocabulary.

For some of us, saying no is easy. And for others, it is something that needs to be developed. Part of being in a functional relationship means that we can honor our own needs and wishes.  If we cannot hold our own, we may end up feeling resentful, which can poison a relationship.

Perhaps the other person will get angry?  Yes, that is possible, and that will undoubtedly have to be worked out. But ultimately, kindly saying no, is one of our rights and a necessary component of being able to work out a relationship. We are all different. We don’t always see things eye to eye. We have to be able to stand on our own two feet while also relating to another.

How are you with saying no? Can you say no without feeling angry or guilty?   Can your partner (or family member or friend) hear your no?

What kind of support or relationship help do you need to be able to honor your own wishes? WeConcile Level 18 specifically focuses on boundaries.

Have a look at our WeConcile Testimonial Video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=sHNHRWbU5gw

Finding Our Rainbow: A Great Relationship

Finding Our Rainbow: A Great Relationship

I have an image of a rainbow arching across the horizon. Like the Star card in a tarot deck, it indicates to me, grace, blessings, and fulfillment. This can include having a great relationship.

How do we find the rainbow in our lives?

Maybe you already have?

We find our rainbow by focusing on beauty and truth. We find it by desiring it. We find it by keeping ourselves out of negative and dark thought habits. Often this means we have to tackle something in our lives. Like a job or relationship that isn’t nourishing. Sometimes we have to bridge two worlds, staying in something that is uncomfortable, as we learn to work with it and make it better – like molding a lump of clay into something with form, function and beauty. Other times we have to find a different attitude, like looking for what does work and what this situation does offer us. And still other times we have to leave that situation, job or relationship.

Often, we have to decide that finding our rainbow is more important than anything else. That means we make the journey to our rainbow our priority. That could mean any number of things including starting a meditation practice, reading books on relationships, getting into therapy, gaining a new skill, joining a gym, or beginning a hobby that nourishes us.

The experience of the rainbow comes from an internal place. So, we choose to grow. We choose to connect with our souls and own our stories. We choose to step into our courage and leave our fears behind. Finding our rainbow comes from having the courage to look at and love ourselves. It comes from making choices that show self-support.  It means we look for support and solutions.

That doesn’t mean there won’t be difficult times. Sometimes we may feel as if we are a small tree in the middle of the forest reaching upward, trying to get to the light. But even though the sky is far above, we keep our eyes on the light.

Being human isn’t easy for anyone. Being in a relationship also isn’t always easy. But being in a relationship should be a source of support in your life. It can be part of your rainbow experience.

What do you have to do in your life to find your rainbow? 

You can see the image of and read about the Star card here: https://labyrinthos.co/blogs/tarot-card-meanings-list/the-star-meaning-major-arcana-tarot-card-meanings

For another article on improving your relationship, check out “Toughing it Out” here: https://blog.weconcile.com/2014/02/03/toughing-it-out/

Embrace the Suck

Embrace the Suck

I’m writing and will be presenting a Continuing Education course for therapists called Clinician Use of WeConcile® to Facilitate Couples Work. (You can find the course here: https://www.goodtherapy.org/clinician-use-weconcile-facilitate-couples-work-web-conference.html). Doing this work is making me think about what it takes to make a change in a relationship, and about the couples who choose to stay stuck instead of tackling this significant part of their lives. And it is making me again look at what actually happens in a person to allow the kind of change that transforms a relationship to something amazing. Yet, so many people are scared of this.

Precisely what is scary for them?  I think it is simply having to experience painful feelings and begin to sort through them. An example of a problematic feeling could be feeling awkward or gross in front of someone else hence feeling a sense of shame. Of course, we have difficult feelings, regardless, but we aren’t consciously choosing to look at them. They just leap out and grab us when we get triggered. We react, and then those feelings subside, or we put them away. We create an outside reason – she made me mad. We aren’t looking deep at why we were triggered. How what she said made us feel unseen or less than. How what she said, triggered an echo of our feelings about how our father made us feel.

This is a quote from Sue Johnson, founder of EFT for couples. “Awareness of emotion is central to healthy functioning …. Since emotional responses orient the individual to his or her own needs and longings and prime the struggle to get those needs met.”

So, for example, suppose Joe had a very successful father, and nothing Joe does makes him feel as if he can match what his father did. So, underneath Joe is going to have some feelings of not being worthy, or not being good enough. Joe’s deep longing is to feel worthy. What does Joe do about this feeling? He pushes it away. He doesn’t feel it. He’s not even aware of this feeling. Instead, he puts his wife down. He takes his yucky feelings and gives them to her – and he’s not even aware of it. She is too controlling, too annoying, too this or that. And she, of course, has her own dynamics that interlock with his. So, they bicker a lot. Sure, they love each other, but they are both in their individual defensive places much of the time. Neither Joe nor his wife has that sense of leaning back into the soft cushion of their relationship because emotionally, they don’t feel fully safe. Who knows when a harsh word will come, or one will criticize the other.

And yet, the process of changing this dynamic is known. Opening up each partner’s inner emotional experience, with a focus on emotional engagement and corrective experiences will allow new ways of relating and new self-structure to emerge.  We just don’t know how to do this. That is why therapy, workshops, and experiential educational systems can help.

What if Joe became able to realize and talk about how being raised by his very successful father impacted his feelings about himself. What if he realized that he was continually reacting to issues that triggered a deep shame he had around feeling as if he was not good enough. What if, as he talked about these feelings, his wife began to understand him better, and he began to understand himself better. What if she began to see how what she did triggered him, and she developed more empathy for him. What if he also came to see how he triggered her and what if in this process of exploration and reconnection Joe began to see her value, and he began to want to connect, rather than push her away. And what if in this process, he found his own worth. And because of all of these shifts, he no longer put his wife down. Because they are now connecting on a deeper level.

Each person has the enormous opportunity to expand and reorganize their inner experience, transforming their relationship.

This quote from Brene Brown encapsulates the way to change, “I believe that you have to walk through vulnerability to get to courage, therefore . . . embrace the suck. I try to be grateful every day, and my motto right now is ‘Courage over comfort.’”

Courage over comfort. That is the key. The primary vehicle for change in a relationship really is developing a better relationship with our own feelings and unpacking why we feel what we feel when we are having that feeling.

To learn how WeConcile protects your privacy go here: https://www.weconcile.com/privacy.html

How Unspoken (And Unanswered) Needs Sabotage A Relationship.

June: I don’t like our gardener. I don’t like how he trimmed the roses. I don’t think he did a good job on the grass. I don’t like…

What is going on here? – Disguised and unspoken feelings. (I feel uncomfortable; I want you to hear my discomfort. I want to know that you will be on my side.)

Bob: Oh. Well, they are all like that. I’ve worked with a lot of them.

What is going on here? – Logical explanation. (I want you to see that it is okay. I don’t want you to be unfair to the gardener. Why aren’t you happy? Everything is okay.)

June: You never listen to me – storms off.

Bob: What happened? What is wrong with her?

Bob didn’t listen to his partner’s unspoken and underlying feelings and needs. He gave a logical explanation instead.

June felt unheard and reacted.

Bob felt ambushed by the emotional reaction of his partner. He hates this feeling of being powerless. He doesn’t know what to do.

How can this couple repair this recurring scenario?

Move in closer to reach for underlying feelings.

Ask yourself, what is June trying to say (but not able to say directly?) What feelings is June experiencing?

Bob’s task is to learn to listen, explore and reflect rather than explain. – I’m sorry you don’t like the gardener. How did that make you feel when the gardener did that? What do you think we should do about it? (Empathy and reflection of what was said, curiosity of deeper feeling, teaming up to solve problem if needed and to show that on partner’s side.)

Bob’s possible resistance – I don’t want to ‘take care’ of my partner that way. I want him/her to be able to tell me what he or she is feeling directly. I shouldn’t have to.

Answer: We all have to ‘take care’ of our partners at times. Especially while they are reaching for support and don’t know how to do it yet.

If you want THIS relationship to work, you have to learn to communicate in a way that your partner can hear you. You aren’t going to get different results from the same actions.

Pull out for birds eye view to see the cycle.

June reaches for support indirectly.

Bob explains to ‘make it all okay’ and to be fair to everyone.

June feels unheard and reacts, in this case perhaps gets angry and attacks

Bob feels ambushed and confused.

June storms off very upset and feeling abandoned.

Bob apologizes but is confused and doesn’t know what to do to fix this.

June ‘beats Bob up emotionally’ because she still feels that it is Bob’s fault.

June eventually and briefly realizes that it wasn’t all Bob’s fault but isn’t able to ‘hold’ onto this awareness.

June and Bob are caught in this dynamic and need to unpack it to ‘see’ what they are caught in and step outside of it TOGETHER. (Not just feel what they are caught in)

How can they talk about the pattern they see happening?

Bob’s new conversation

It seems that when you reach for support and I don’t realize it, I try to make everything okay by explaining. You feel unsupported and abandoned and get angry and lash out at me. I feel punished by your anger. It hurts a lot. I will try to slow down and be more curious about your needs. I need you to try to tell me what is going on.

June’s new conversation

Yes, I guess I am reaching for support and I don’t even realize it until you talk in a way that feels so unsupportive to me. I will try to let you know that I am feeling let down and needing something from you instead of flying off the handle. I need you to try to pay attention to what I am really saying. I’m not so good at realizing what I am asking for until I am disappointed and we are in a fight.

Bob and Jane are working on building an more solid place to stand, where they are there for each other emotionally and also talking about the cycle or pattern they get caught in.

 

Announcing WeConcile™

Architecting Your Own Intimacy – Repairing, Rebuilding & Creating Love

I have been deep in writing a new web-based and interactive program to help couples (or any two people) connect more fully and resolve conflicts, bringing harmony and peace to their relationship. This is something that I have been working on for nearly two years (and with some months to go before it is complete).

How I make my own life meaningful, and what inspires me, is the process of focusing on and stepping into the dark parts of myself, my relationships and my world in order to bring light, peace, beauty and love into those areas that are un-enlightened, fearful, suffering or in pain. As I look at the trauma and darkness in the world around me, this feels especially pertinent at this time. For me, life is a metaphor of bringing light into our own darkness, whether it is external in the outer world, or internal, in my own self and process. Consequently, bringing harmony, peace and love into our lives and relationships is a process that I am deeply involved in.

Because I grew up in an environment with emotional trauma, conflict and disconnection, and have spent years not only undoing the damage caused by that, transforming my own negative parts, and expanding and developing myself, this mission is close to my heart.  I believe that we can all learn to engage in the ‘underground’ processes of healing, and collaborate and support each other in this endeavor.

Over the years of working both as a therapist and a couples’ therapist I have come to believe that something more is needed to help all of us with our relationships.  Many of us just don’t have the skills we need. Therapy has limitations due to its cost, and many therapists, though effective with individuals, don’t have the specialized training needed to be effective when working with couples. The time constraints of people’s busy lives, and the stigma that therapy has for some also inhibit people seeking help.  Additionally, I have wanted to expand out of working one-to-one to a place where I could do more writing and impact a larger group.

I began to think about a low cost way to ‘teach’ people while overcoming these obstacles. I began to wonder if I could make experiential relationship help available to the many who cannot afford couples counseling – a place where they could learn, while collaborating and supporting each other. I found the idea exciting, although scary. Am I wasting my time? Can this actually be done and can I do it?  Couples therapy is hard enough with a therapist in the room. How could it possibly work on the web?

One day, a web programmer friend was visiting.  As he talked about his web-based product, a light bulb went off.  ‘This can be done,’ I thought.  At the time, I was continuing in advanced training in couple’s therapy.  So along with my knowledge of self-growth and healing and my ability to write, all the pieces were there.  Thus began the birth of WeConcile™.

Let me present some broad ideas about what needs to happen in any ‘self growth’ endeavor by starting with some observations and analogies.

I was watching TV the other night and a dancer/choreographer whose name I don’t remember was talking on a panel. The other 4 people on the panel were not dancers.  I was very aware of how evolved this man’s body and being appeared, how he moved his arms and gestured when he talked, how he carried himself, how his body and self seemed much more alive than the others.  It was clear that as a dancer, he had developed a relationship to his body, lets call it his mind/body, extensively, and in a way the others had not.  In comparison, they appeared almost unintelligent.

In contrast to those who are highly developed, are those of us who are ‘regular,’ with more typical levels of skill and ability.

And then there are those of us who have been deprived, neglected or even abused in some way while we were developing.  Our development has actually been suppressed, leaving us with gaps in our skill set, or perhaps having to adapt, almost the way a tree that is growing under a large object has to bend and twist and turn to find its way to the sun, or how one that is growing in bad soil or a harsh environment may end up smaller.

This is the spectrum, ranging from the full development of one’s capacity, even beyond what most people do, through the realm of normal, all the way to a place where there are scars or underdevelopment caused by abuse or limitations.

Lets apply these ideas to relationships.  Successful relationships often require all three things:

  • The correcting of places where our development had been hindered (which we are often unaware of, but our partners will be feeling the consequence of.)
  • The healing of actual emotional wounds that cause reactivity and pain.
  • The further development of our potential in ways that surpass the current norm, as the ‘normal’ level of relationship skills alone often isn’t sufficient to have a truly satisfying relationship at this time in history.

In overcoming a deficit or injury, we may actually have to overcompensate and develop capacities that are generally greater than what the ‘regular’ person has.

Given that relationships often bring up anything that is undeveloped or unhealed in ourselves, how do you get a relationship that is more peaceful, harmonious and loving?  Lets switch contexts for just a moment and look at a similar but different question.

How do you get a healthier body? You have to look at what you are feeding the body, how you are using it and taking care of it. We can put it in a list:

  • Learn and apply over time the guidelines of nutrition
  • Learn and apply over time appropriate exercise
  • Learn and apply over time the reduction of stress
  • Attend to and heal any injuries
  • Build up and support any areas of weakness
  • Utilize a community of people who continue to develop these ideas and/or     provide support.

That was easy.  We all know how to create a healthier body, whether we have the support to do it or not.  But we don’t all know how to create healthier relationships.  In fact, creating a healthier relationship can be incredibly difficult – just look at the divorce statistics.  But the same principles apply.  Lets look at what it will take:

  • Education – feeding your body new guidelines of ‘relational nutrition.’
  • Exercise – experiential exercises to help you ‘rewire’ and develop aspects of your brain to improve your ‘relation-ability.’
  • Communication exercises, tools and guidelines to help you and your partner learn to communicate in a different and more supportive way.
  • Questions and exercises to identify and attend to old wounds.
  • Questions and exercises to identify and attend to areas needing development.
  • A community of others who are involved in the same process and willing to talk about it and support each other.

So like changing your body, changing yourself or your relationship requires education and knowledge over time. It requires the application of that education and knowledge allowing for new habits to build, and support, whether from a therapist, a friend, or a community of like-minded others.

The first question I ask a couple or family unit who is coming to see me is, “What do you want?”  Or “What do the two of you want?”  Generally the answer I get is: “We want to get along, we want to stop fighting, we want a peaceful, harmonious and loving relationship.”

This is what WeConcile™ will help you do.  It should be out by the end of the 2013.

Emotions and Emotional Release

Emotions are intense.  They rock us.  We have to deal with them. Someone says something the wrong way, or we are in a difficult situation and all of a sudden we might find ourselves in a fury, or in deep grief, or perhaps an awful sense of embarrassment and shame as if we are ‘bad’.  When we are in these feeling places we usually don’t have any perspective, or not much.  It is like we got dropped off and lost in some horrible bad place and we cannot get ourselves out.  We have no control.  We don’t know what happened to us.  And on top of that, we often judge ourselves for having these lapses of control, or even worse, deny they ever happened. (This last one is sure to wreck havoc on your relationships.)   And it is scary.  What if our out of control feelings cause someone to judge us or reject us?

One way around this is to prevent ourselves from having feelings.  When I run into this in my practice, I generally refer to the ‘basement’ with all the feelings that are locked in and can’t get out.  You have to disconnect from yourself to do this.  You may feel more in control, but it is a disastrous state for a human being who has to know his or herself and relate to others.  We end up depressed, or detached and shut down, or having reactions way out of proportion to events that jump out and ambush whoever is unlucky enough to trigger us.

Recently for me, I had some very large feelings come up. They just pushed their way through and I let myself experience them. Meanwhile I felt confused, ashamed, and small, wondering what was wrong with me.  Pretty interesting as I’m somebody who is extremely good at unearthing and processing the hard stuff.  It made me realize how primal these feelings were and how hard it is for all of us as emotional beings to let the emotions take over and just experience them without judgment and without control.

The fear I think, is that either we are crazy, or that these feelings will pummel us for the rest of our lives and we won’t be able to live with ourselves, be adult, logical, and rational.  And yes, this can be part of the process of somebody with a major mood disorder, but that means they don’t have the other piece of solid ground they can hold onto and use as an anchor.  Instead it is a place they live in.  But this isn’t true for most of us.

I realized something else too.  The only way I was going to transcend what I was struggling with was by allowing the feelings to come through.  So, lying on my yoga mat during savasana, I just let the tears come up and I let myself completely feel the shame and grief that was moving though me.  Then it got clearer.  I could see a piece of my past differently than ever before.  I could see a very specific negative message I had gotten and how it had hindered me.  And I could see that by allowing myself to feel, I was processing and letting go of this belief.  I couldn’t change the belief until I experienced and released all the feelings that were connected to it. I couldn’t transcend the old me until I let myself go and really experienced what these feelings were.  This type of change is not a mental decision, but an emotional process.

This is the part of therapy that people who haven’t had therapy don’t understand. Yes, we talk about things and make sense of them, but often, for many of us, there is a very emotional piece that must occur.  It is like a tidal wave coming through, taking whatever is not solid with it, so that after it retracts the landscape is different.  Who we are has been changed permanently.

Yes, it is scary to descend into the depths of our feelings where the logical rational world isn’t present.  But it is also a very important aspect of healing.   We do survive these lapses.  And we have to tell ourselves, “these are just feelings”. “I am not crazy.”  Experiencing feelings in this way is important. They are telling us something we need to know, something about how our reality has been constructed. This is the releasing process that occurs when we are making big changes in who we are.  It is part of what must happen when we have core beliefs that need to shift.

Experiencing feelings is part of being human.  It is also part of the process of healing.  Reacting out of our feelings is very different than feeling these feelings.  For instance, snapping at somebody and blaming him or her for something is very different than experiencing the grief of being disappointed and hurt.  Once you allow yourself to descend into the disappointment and hurt, you can find the part of you that wasn’t valued at another point in your life.  You can explore and come to understand how that has impacted you.  You can get to know that grief and then you can heal from it.

How do you deal with your feelings?

Do you recognize them as a valuable part of living?

Do you try to avoid them?

Do they jump out at inopportune moments and sabotage you?

Do you allow yourself to have them and process them?

Do you get stuck in them, or can you understand their message and release them?

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